Behind the Scenes with Lincoln Crisler Pt. III: Struttin’ Your Stuff

Here’s the third and final part of my look at the inner workings of crafting, selling and promoting fiction. Thanks for sticking with me for the entire series and special thanks to Edie for having me aboard! If you like what you’ve seen here, drop in over at http://lincolncrisler.com for a steady flow of information, fun and venting from a tempermental artist!

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Where do you go from here? A publisher has taken on your work, which we’ll assume for the sake of argument (since the bulk of my experience is with short fiction) is a short story appearing in a magazine or anthology. Now you need to entice fans to read your work.

Most publishers can be counted on to do at least something to get the word out; how much effort they’ll expend usually depends on the publisher’s budget. At the end of the day, publishing’s an investment. An editor’s taken on your work because they feel it’s good enough to make them (and you) a bit of money. The amount of cash they’ll spend on promoting the book depends on how much they have on hand AND how much return they think they’ll get on their investment. Unless you sign a deal with a major publisher, be prepared to shoulder most of the burden. Life ain’t fair, and roses have thorns.

As a writer, the very least you need is a website. Preferably something easily recognizable, like your name. Free websites are a dime a dozen but are usually cluttered with ads and they don’t look as professional. Space on a webserver and your own personal domain name don’t cost that much, though; I pay $35/year to my webhost, http://tinyhosts.com. If you’re not into web design, there are lots of templates available on the internet. Me being a computer geek, I’ve toyed with my website almost constantly since it’s inception in 2006. I’ve finally settled on what I feel is the best option; a blog with columns on either side of the page with information on my books, favorite links, RSS feeds from interesting blogs and other neat stuff. Bottom line is you need a central collection point for news and updates on your work and links to publications featuring your stories. Making it fun and interesting will keep readers attention.

Having a blog is one of my favorite promotions. Aside from the website (though I do encourage integrating your blog with your website) it’s a place where you can sound off on all sorts of topics; I’ve reviewed comic books and novels, preached my politics, posted awesome recipes from my kitchen, given social commentary and vented about rough days all in addition to updates on my projects and books featuring my work. With proper use of tags and categories, readers searching for all sorts of topics can stumble across your blog, enjoy your unique perspective and take a closer look at your fiction. As a sidebar, I can now recommend, from experience, guest-blogging on someone else’s blog as an excellent promotion. Of course this is fun, too, but hopefully someone’ll read these things and click over to my site; just like I hope someone on my site clicks over to here and then Edie’ll get a new fan, too.

Another great promotion strategy is to set up book signings. Sometimes a publisher will set up signings, sometimes they won’t, but either way you can set up signings on your own. When I set up my first signing at a local Barnes & Noble, I spoke with the manager, we set a date, they ordered copies of my book and I appeared at the appointed time and signed them. It went rather well, I met a lot of new fans and hopefully they’ll all introduce at least one person to the awesome new writer they met at the bookstore.

MySpace is a great resource for creators, even if it does look like Teenybopperworld at first glance. There are a LOT of writers, musicians, artists, comedians, filmmakers, etc. on MySpace all yours for the meeting. I’ve gotten market leads, contacted fellow writers and editors and even discovered the publisher of my collection, Despairs & Delights, on MySpace. I can honestly say my career would be different without it. Heck, if you’re really web-challenged, you can make a great MySpace profile, complete with blog and information on your work, with relatively little effort.

A friend of mine, the absolutely wonderful Fran Friel, loves to run contests as a promotion. Comment on her blog at the right time and your name goes into a hat for a chance at winning all sorts of wonderful stuff, from a signed copy of one of her books to (I believe, don’t quote me) an original manuscript. I haven’t tried this yet, but I will soon. It’s definitely an attention-grabber. Who doesn’t like free stuff?

Finally, there are message boards. I’m only familiar with the horror ones, so I won’t get into specifics, but you can do a Google Search for “(insert genre” message boards” and find a million of ’em. You’ll find potential fans, other writers, reviewers, publishers and potential business partners talking about a range of topics from daily life to upcoming projects. On some you can even exchange critiques with other writers. The only one I’ll recommend to any creator regardless of genre is http://www.zoetrope.com. It’s sponsored by Francis Ford Coppola. I’m a member of several offices on the site and my career wouldn’t even exist without some of the people I’ve met there.

So that’s about it. If you’re a writer, I hope I’ve been able to impart some knowledge to you and if you’re a reader, I hope I’ve given you an enjoyable look behind the scenes (without ruining anything for you, of course). Thanks for reading!

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Lincoln Crisler hails from upstate New York. It’s cold there. That’s why he learned to read at an early age. So he could enjoy books. Inside. Where it’s warm. And not cold. Check out his website to see if all that book-learnin’ paid off and send fan- (or hate-) mail to lincoln@lincolncrisler.com

 

Can You Haiku? (Contest)

Write a winter or holiday themed haiku and win a $5 gift certificate to giveanything.com, spendable at over 300 online stores, including Linens N Things, CD Universe, and Online Books Direct.  (For a full list of participating stores, view the categories on the left side of this page.)

Haikus are fairly easy to write, even for non-writers, so give it a whirl — you might just surprise yourself.  Also, I’ve noticed that compared to the amount of visitors this site gets, the amount of comments is fairly low — even for my easiest contest ever where all you had to do was leave a comment to win a prize.  What does that mean for you?  It means that just by entering, you have a good shot at winning.

A haiku is a 3-line poem with a syllable count of 5/7/5 (so 5 syllables in the first line, 7 in the second line, and 5 in the third line).  No rhyming necessary.  Here is an example:

A winter haiku
Spend five minutes writing it
And make five dollars

There is no limit on how many haikus you can enter.  Leave your haiku(s) as a comment to this post.  Your gift certificate will be sent to the email you enter when you leave your comment, but your email address will only be veiwable by me.  Also, I will not send you junkmail or sell your email address to anyone.

I’ll feature the winning haiku in its own post, so don’t forget to include the author name you want to go with it.  The deadline is December 20th.  Have fun! 

November 07 Comment Contest Winner

Congratulations Glenn Ingersoll.  You are the winner of the easiest contest ever!  Please let me know which site you’d like your ginormously huge monetary reward ($5 gift certificate) to go to:  amazon.com or cafepress.com.

And for everyone who hasn’t won yet but would like to, check back for another easy contest in December.

Easiest Contest Ever

Want 5 bucks?  All you have to do is comment on a post on this blog between now and November 29, 2007.  One lucky person will win their choice of a $5 gift certificate to either amazon.com* or cafepress.com.

The gift certificate will be sent to whichever email address you use when making your comment.  (Your email address will not be posted and will only be viewable by me, and I won’t sell it or send you junkmail or anything like that.)

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*It does not appear that amazon.com gift certificates are transferrable to other amazon sites, such as amazon.co.uk, so make sure you are able to order from amazon.com if you go with this option.  Cafepress.com, on the other hand, ships to almost anywhere in the world.

Saving the World, One Blog at a Time

What is ozone abuse?  I have no clue, but maybe I’ll find out on September 27th, 2007, when bloggers are challenged by blogcatalog.com to blog about abuse (you choose which kind).  In addition, copywriteink.com is sponsoring a contest where you can win prizes and have a donation made to charity in your name when you participate.  Take part in history, mark your calendar, blog to change the world.

Also, some cellphone blogger called Nine made these graphics.  Nice job.