Horror Flash Fiction – A Taste for Life

There’s a new flash fiction story by Patrick Freivald over at Flash Fiction Online that you should really check out, especially if you like it when your stories come with a healthy dose of creepiness.  It’s called A Taste for Life

“And how old were you when you died, Mister Beauchamp?” Joan Rothman asked, leaning back in her chair. The scientists watched her behind the one-way mirror, hands clasped behind their backs.  “Twenty-seven,” the corpse replied, more gurgle than speech, as it gazed idly around the interview room.

To read the rest of this short short story, click the link above.

Flash Fiction: Dani-Girl’s Guide to Getting Everything Right

Author, Gay Degani, has a great flash fiction story out called Dani-Girl’s Guide to Getting Everything Right.  This short short story starts out:

The minute the nose of my Honda Civic points north on the 5, my hands begin to sweat, my breath goes shallow, and somewhere down in my lower intestinal tract I feel a rumbling similar to distant thunder, just not as pleasant. Don’t Go Home is the first cardinal rule in Dani-Girl’s Guide to Getting Everything Right, and after a lifetime in Lomita with my German-Irish father, Rule 1 is easy to follow. After all, most of our communications begin with him grumbling, “Can’t you get anything right?”

Read this entire flash fiction story at Flash Fiction Online, a flash fiction online literary magazine, or read more short fiction at the Flash Fiction Online homepage.  You can also visit Gay Degani’s homepage or buy one of Gay Degani’s books at amazon.com.

I love it when I discover talented authors previously unknown to me, and I’m definitely going to be keeping an eye on this one and looking for more of her stuff to read.

Watermelon Goblins, A Short Short Story

Check out Teresa Valle’s flash fiction story, Watermelon Goblins, on her blog, Cuentos, Little Stories by Teresa(Note: the link points to the full poem which has a couple of slightly off-color words.  Nothing major, but I like to warn people.) 

Here is an excerpt:

There’s a story everybody tells about a box that should never be opened, and in the story of course somebody always opens it and then things happen. This is a story told by all the people of the world, is what my grandmother always said. In some stories the box is made of gold, or pewter, or brass. In some it is made of woven rushes, or thin porcelain or wood. In my grandmother’s version, the box is made of mud, and inside the box lives a storyteller also made of mud. He is a mud goblin, with reaching hands and a large slobbering mouth.

It’s a pleasantly rambling story, yet it is still cohesive in its own quirky way.  It almost reads like creative nonfiction, except it’s creative fiction.  Teresa admits to “blenderizing fact and fiction” in her About Me page, so who knows, part of it could be nonfiction.  She also shares on her About Me page that her brothers have enormous foreheads but that her and her iguana have relatively small ones.