Poets are like Butterflies

The editor of Poesy Magazine proclaims on his News page that he’s “back again,” and, after 18 months of downtime, he’s “continuing Poesy and returning refreshed, rested and with a vengance to make an impact.”  Except that was posted 5 months ago and there doesn’t seem to be any activity since. 

Ah, well.  I know what it’s like to burn out on a project; I myself am the proud owner of a number of abandoned blogs and social networking pages strewn far and wide across the internet.  Anyway, the good news is that you can still read some cool stuff on the site, including several featured poems from the last issue.

Photo courtesy Asumann at Stock.Xchnge

Following is an excerpt from a poem called “Poem for David Church” by A.D. Winans.  It is from a memorial poem written for a poet who passed away:

poets are like butterflies
inhabiting temporary space
tasting the pollen of life
spreading their wings
reshaping the stars the universe
cosmic matter waiting to be reborn

Online Literary Journals 2

Online literary journals are abundant on the web, but for some reason can be difficult to find.  I’ve gathered together in one place 10 links to different literary journals that have been featured in the last 3 months or so here at A Bunch of Wordz.  These literary magazines often feature poetry, short stories, articles, nonfiction, book reviews, and more.

Readers will want to click on the main page, while links to the call for submission guidelines have also been provided for writers looking to submit their work.

To see even more online literary journals and submission guidelines, see my previous post Online Literary Journals 1.

Flash Fiction: Dani-Girl’s Guide to Getting Everything Right

Author, Gay Degani, has a great flash fiction story out called Dani-Girl’s Guide to Getting Everything Right.  This short short story starts out:

The minute the nose of my Honda Civic points north on the 5, my hands begin to sweat, my breath goes shallow, and somewhere down in my lower intestinal tract I feel a rumbling similar to distant thunder, just not as pleasant. Don’t Go Home is the first cardinal rule in Dani-Girl’s Guide to Getting Everything Right, and after a lifetime in Lomita with my German-Irish father, Rule 1 is easy to follow. After all, most of our communications begin with him grumbling, “Can’t you get anything right?”

Read this entire flash fiction story at Flash Fiction Online, a flash fiction online literary magazine, or read more short fiction at the Flash Fiction Online homepage.  You can also visit Gay Degani’s homepage or buy one of Gay Degani’s books at amazon.com.

I love it when I discover talented authors previously unknown to me, and I’m definitely going to be keeping an eye on this one and looking for more of her stuff to read.

Flash Fiction Award-Winning “Walking Upside Down”

Sometimes sudden fiction blurs the line between the short short story and poetry.  Walking Upside Down, John Ravenscroft’s previous winner of the Storycove Flash Fiction Award, is one such piece.  Personally, I think this would read better as a long poem than a flash fiction story, but no matter how it’s presented, there’s no denying it’s a fantastic piece of writing.  It starts out:

“In my dreams, the good ones, Mary Iris McCormack – Mim for short – is forever doing handstands, her knees bent, her feet planted flat against the redbrick playground wall. The skirt of her school uniform hangs like a soft green bell about the half-hidden clapper of her head, and when she turns to face me I see strange, knowing, upside-down eyes…”

You can read the flash fiction story “Walking Upside Down” in its entirety at the online literary journal, Word Smitten.

So what do you think?  Is it a story or is it a poem?

Someone Else’s Things

I read a lot of poetry I don’t like.  Some days I get lucky and find something good right away; other days, I have to plow through a mountain of bad poetry in my search for that one poem that will bring a smile to my lips.  Today was one of those “mountain of bad poetry” days, but I finally found what I was looking for.  It’s a short poem called Someone Else’s Things by Ann Alexander, and it appears at Magma Poetry Online.  Take a moment to click through and read it.

No Third Date

Okay, I wasn’t even sure I liked this online magazine upon first perusal, but now it is quickly becoming one of my favorites.  It’s quirky, strange, a little silly, and perhaps an acquired taste, but one I’ve now grown to love.

Don’t miss the poem by Marilyn Letts called No Third Date at Feathertale.com.  The last line/last reason for not having a third date was the best and had me chuckling.

The Orange Room Review

Thank you to Justin Hyde for sending me an email and turning me on to the online poetry journal, The Orange Room Review.  (Yes, I am getting some emails, but I’m not sure if I’m getting all emails, so if you’ve sent me one and think I’m ignoring you, I probably didn’t receive it.  Or possibly I actually am ignoring you and using this as an excuse. 😉 )  Anyhoo…

Justin has another exceptional poem (I don’t think he writes any other kind) published in the current edition called she told me her mother slept with a revolver.  This is one of those poems where an excerpt wouldn’t do it justice — you have to read it as a whole to get the full impact, so go click on the link above.

Interestingly and coincidentally, the current issue also features a poem by Zachary Bush who was just featured in a recent post here at A Bunch of Wordz.  The poem is called My First Week at the Boys Boarding School.

Also, check out Before Dawn by Elliot Richard Dorfman.  I like the rhythmic flow he achieved in this short poem and the way he put his words together to convey a certain kind of feeling to go along with what he had to say.  Here are a few lines:

“In the dark, the mellow chimes
of my clock strike the hours.
I feel serene and transfixed in a world that
seems to be mine, alone.”

I know I have a few regular readers who are writers themselves, so I thought it worth mentioning that the turnaround for submissions at this magazine is unusually fast at between 1 and 14 days — good news if you’re looking for a quick response to your poetry submittal.