Online Literary Journals 2

Online literary journals are abundant on the web, but for some reason can be difficult to find.  I’ve gathered together in one place 10 links to different literary journals that have been featured in the last 3 months or so here at A Bunch of Wordz.  These literary magazines often feature poetry, short stories, articles, nonfiction, book reviews, and more.

Readers will want to click on the main page, while links to the call for submission guidelines have also been provided for writers looking to submit their work.

To see even more online literary journals and submission guidelines, see my previous post Online Literary Journals 1.

Flash Fiction Award-Winning “Walking Upside Down”

Sometimes sudden fiction blurs the line between the short short story and poetry.  Walking Upside Down, John Ravenscroft’s previous winner of the Storycove Flash Fiction Award, is one such piece.  Personally, I think this would read better as a long poem than a flash fiction story, but no matter how it’s presented, there’s no denying it’s a fantastic piece of writing.  It starts out:

“In my dreams, the good ones, Mary Iris McCormack – Mim for short – is forever doing handstands, her knees bent, her feet planted flat against the redbrick playground wall. The skirt of her school uniform hangs like a soft green bell about the half-hidden clapper of her head, and when she turns to face me I see strange, knowing, upside-down eyes…”

You can read the flash fiction story “Walking Upside Down” in its entirety at the online literary journal, Word Smitten.

So what do you think?  Is it a story or is it a poem?

Someone Else’s Things

I read a lot of poetry I don’t like.  Some days I get lucky and find something good right away; other days, I have to plow through a mountain of bad poetry in my search for that one poem that will bring a smile to my lips.  Today was one of those “mountain of bad poetry” days, but I finally found what I was looking for.  It’s a short poem called Someone Else’s Things by Ann Alexander, and it appears at Magma Poetry Online.  Take a moment to click through and read it.

No Third Date

Okay, I wasn’t even sure I liked this online magazine upon first perusal, but now it is quickly becoming one of my favorites.  It’s quirky, strange, a little silly, and perhaps an acquired taste, but one I’ve now grown to love.

Don’t miss the poem by Marilyn Letts called No Third Date at Feathertale.com.  The last line/last reason for not having a third date was the best and had me chuckling.

The Orange Room Review

Thank you to Justin Hyde for sending me an email and turning me on to the online poetry journal, The Orange Room Review.  (Yes, I am getting some emails, but I’m not sure if I’m getting all emails, so if you’ve sent me one and think I’m ignoring you, I probably didn’t receive it.  Or possibly I actually am ignoring you and using this as an excuse. 😉 )  Anyhoo…

Justin has another exceptional poem (I don’t think he writes any other kind) published in the current edition called she told me her mother slept with a revolver.  This is one of those poems where an excerpt wouldn’t do it justice — you have to read it as a whole to get the full impact, so go click on the link above.

Interestingly and coincidentally, the current issue also features a poem by Zachary Bush who was just featured in a recent post here at A Bunch of Wordz.  The poem is called My First Week at the Boys Boarding School.

Also, check out Before Dawn by Elliot Richard Dorfman.  I like the rhythmic flow he achieved in this short poem and the way he put his words together to convey a certain kind of feeling to go along with what he had to say.  Here are a few lines:

“In the dark, the mellow chimes
of my clock strike the hours.
I feel serene and transfixed in a world that
seems to be mine, alone.”

I know I have a few regular readers who are writers themselves, so I thought it worth mentioning that the turnaround for submissions at this magazine is unusually fast at between 1 and 14 days — good news if you’re looking for a quick response to your poetry submittal.

Off Course

This is from a poem is called Hard Labor by Rebecca Lu Kiernan and appears in a 2005 edition of the literary journal, Off Course:

“I would crawl over uncharted shipwrecks,
Frozen tundra, rip tides,
To touch you in the dance
Of bent cobalt willows
Tremulous in the grey December rain.

I would walk the fractures
Of thinly frozen lakes
To taste you
In the cotton candy pink light
Of the year’s final sunset.”

Go here to read the rest of this poem or see other poems written by the same author.

Here is an exerpt from the current edition — a poem called Fashion Secretaries by Chris Crittenden:

“smiles that tilt like teapots
steeping words in fluff,
red and apple-sexed,

limber when pursed.”

Go here to read the rest of Crittenden’s poem and other poetry by this author.

Two Random Moments

Lyn Cannaday’s work has been featured on this blog before.  She’s a talented writer, and I’d like to do my part to help her get exposure.  She recently had a poem published at poeticdiversity called Two Random Moments.  Here’s an excerpt:

“My heart tripped on the history of tuffets and cheap horror films
Where cameras magnify tiny bodies.
Then I paused and saw the petite, dark body
delicately balanced at the center of those questing legs
like a dancer flowing gracefully across the stage of my sweaty arm”

Visit the above link to read the entire piece.

4AM Poetry Review

If you visit this blog often, you’ve probably witnessed me going on and on about 3AM Magazine (who, by the way, still has not gotten back to me regarding poems I submitted at the beginning of August).  Should I re-submit at the beginning of November? Or just call it a loss and move on?

Anyway, did you know there’s also a 4AM Magazine called 4AM Poetry Review?  It’s mostly a print magazine but does have some stuff online, like this great poem by Rebecca Loudon:

Fool, fool, fool, fool, fool.
She might be pregnant-bloated
face, thighs, hips, hands, mouth.
Love is a stupid feathery thing
that should be shot down with rock salt.”

Read the rest of this poem, called Danses Sacrées et Profanes, at the site, visit the 4AM homepage, or subscribe to the magazine.

Needle! Now! Broken!

Wow.  Needle! Now! Broken! by Brett Allen Smith is a short story written in a very different and very cool style.  Me like.  You read:

“He felt the absence immediately upon waking, so obvious that he fell out of his bed, tearing from his arms the tubes that had only the day before been preserving him. And as he fell, he felt the tubes tugging the length of his own tubes, the organic ones inside, and for an instant he knew with stabbing certainty that he would be torn inside out.

He was. Oh. He wasn’t at all, actually.

When he hit the ground, the plastic yielded to his weight and snapped, squirting streamers of blood upon release. He laughed with a blissful, forgiving kind of laugh which— oh—in retrospect—ah—seems sad (me already knowing the ending of the story).”

Visit the above link and read the entire story or go to Fringe for more stories, poetry, nonfiction, and other cool stuff.

Prick of the Spindle

Prick of the Spindle is a brand new online literary journal featuring poetry, fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and literary reviews.  It’s off to a good start with solid pieces and a simple yet creative layout.  I’m thinking about submitting some of my work to them.  Here are some brief snippets of what Prick of the Spindle has to offer.

PoetryThis town with the train and the prison on the top of the hill by Susanna Fry:

“black spots and stripes
this rooftop town
of poison ivy and open windows
open wounds
this refuge”

The poem is done in 6 parts, offering 6 unique views of the town.  I like the way this was done.

FictionWriting My Angel by Corey Messler:

“His face wore the countenance I have seen in nightmares where those who love me turn on me like formerly tame wolves.”

A piece of micro fiction.  Every sentence is engaging.  Very well written.

Creative NonfictionTectonic Synapses by Derek Ramsey Holst:

“As you hang there waiting for all the blood in your body to pool in the center of your brain, you think names like, Hemingway, Dickinson, and Poe. You ask the question everyone asks, were they writers because they were crazy, or were they crazy because they were writers?”

This piece seems random at first as it circles around and around until you see how all the pieces fit together at the end.

Do check out this online lit mag as it has a lot to offer.